Defensive Coordinator’s Football Handbook

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Football, Defense, Defensive Coordinators, HandbookFootball, Defense, Defensive Coordinators, Handbook

FootballFootball The strategies and tactics necessary to stop 19 of today’s most potent running plays An explanation of the adjustments and techniques necessary to install seven variations of man-to-man pass coverages versus 10 different contemporary offensive formations 12 suggestions for obtaining longevity in the coaching profession An explanation of the adjustments and techniques necessary to install five variations of zone and combo pass coverages versus 10 different cotemporary offensive formations Twelve different stunt strategies that enable your defense to actually attack the offense Sample pass coverage/stunt menus for: the 3-3-5, 4-2-5, bear 46, 3-4, 4-3, and weak eagle defenses Suggestions for grading player performance and developing scouting reports and practice plans 101 quotes, poems, and anecdotes that can be used to motivate and inspire your players

Defensive Coordinator’s Football Handbook

What You’ll Find in This Book

Defensive Coordinator’s Football Handbook is a complete guide for football coaches. The information contained in the book has been compiled by Leo Hand during 47 years of coaching championship teams at both the high school and collegiate levels. Numerous topics are covered that will enable any coach to successfully understand and defend modern offenses.

An overview of contemporary offensive trends and the forerunner strategies and techniques that spawned them A system for identifying offensive formations and personnel groupings A simple system, with universal application, for creating multiple defensive fronts and secondary coverages The base reads, reactions, and techniques for all 15 alignments that a defensive lineman can be positioned in The base reads, reactions, and techniques for linebackers A synopsis of the responsibilities and techniques necessary to install 20 different odd and even eight-man fronts A summation of the responsibilities and techniques necessary to install 20 different odd and even seven-man fronts The run responsibilities and techniques for both three-deep and four-deep secondaries

Contemporary Offense Overview and Preview

Single Wing Offense, Football, Offense

Single Wing Offense, Football, Offense

Empty Formation, Football, Offense

Empty Formation, Football, Offense

Motion T Offense, Football

Motion T Offense, Football

Football, Split T, Offense

Football, Split T, Offense

The Single Wing

Pop Warner is credited with the most sophisticated development of this offense. The player who received the snap from the center was referred to as the tailback. He was positioned four to five yards behind the center. The player aligned in the backfield near the quarterback was referred to as the fullback, and the player positioned near the line of scrimmage behind the strongside offensive tackle was called the blocking back (1). The single wing passing game was primarily a play-action attack. The strength of this offense was its ability to outnumber the defense at the point of attack. The single wing was primarily a power attack featuring sweeps, traps, and off-tackle plays toward the unbalanced side of the formation, and reverses and counter plays toward the weakside. Many variations evolved. Some of these were the double wing, the short punt, the A formation, and the Notre Dame box. The most significant development to ever evolve from the single wing was the spinner series (2).

The Empty Formation

Dutch Meyer was the head coach at TCU from 1934 until 1952. During his tenure, he compiled a 109-79-13 record, won a national championship and three Southwest Conference championships, and his teams appeared in seven bowl games. In 1952, Prentice Hall published his book Spread Formation Football. Image shows the primary formation featured in this book. From this formation, Coach Meyer delineates over 100 pass and run plays. Coach Meyer is, without a doubt, the father of the modern spread offense.

Man-in-Motion T Formation

Historians tell us that the T formation was football’s first formation, but its popularity was short-lived. It was quickly replaced by Pop Warner’s single wing and its many variations. One coach, despite a great deal of criticism, held fast to the T. That coach was George Halas, head coach of the Chicago Bears. In 1940, Halas’s Bears won the NFL championship by beating the Washington Redskins 73-0. The T immediately became football’s state-of-the-art offense and remained so for decades. In 1941, Clark Shaughnessy of Stanford University, Ralph Jones of Lake Forest College, and George Halas published a book titled The Modern T Formation With Man-in-Motion. In the book’s introduction, they describe the offense as a ‘boxing type of offense’ in which ‘pass plays should be used as the unexpected sock.’ This offense’s contribution to our contemporary style of play is that it did emphasize the importance of throwing the football and stretching the field horizontally.

The Split T

Don Faurot introduced the split-T to college football in 1941 and changed traditional T formation football in two major ways: he used large line splits, and the main staple of his running game was the option. Both Faurot and his former assistant, Bud Wilkinson, achieved extraordinary success with the split-T by amassing a combined win/loss record of 322-125-17 at different schools. In his 1979 book, PB: The Paul Brown Story, Coach Brown states: ‘The split-T helped revolutionize college football, and some of its principles, such as the wishbone and veer formations that are in vogue today.’ Most contemporary offenses now employ large line splits and incorporate some type of option play in their running game.

Contemporary Offense Trends

Attempting to Force the Defense to Defend the Entire Field

Coaches should remember that plays are seldom initiated from the middle of the field. At least 80 percent of the time, a play originates on a hash mark or within four yards of a hash. When a play is initiated from one of the hash marks, the defense is confronted with defending an unbalanced field. The wideside of the field is 35.6 yards in high school and 33.3 yards in college. The shortside of the field is 17.8 yards in high school and 20 yards in college. Defensive coordinators must, therefore, analyze the tendencies of how the offense is positioning personnel and utilizing space in their play calling.

The Use of Four-Receiver Sets for the Purpose of Allowing Skilled Players to Operate in Space

Allowing skilled players to operate in space is one of the obvious advantages of four receiver sets; however, all four receivers probably do not possess the same level of athleticism. Some may even be operating on semi-flat tires and/or possess mediocre hands. This is especially true at the high school level. Therefore, it is important that defensive coaches analyze which receivers are the go-to guys and make certain that these players get the utmost attention when devising defensive game plans.

Using Spread Formations in an Attempt to Limit the Number of Defensive Fronts a Team Is Capable of Employing

The defense is still capable of loading the box with at least six defenders and sometimes even seven defenders versus poor passing teams. The positioning of these defenders in countless alignments is not only possible, but prevalent versus the spread.

Using Spread Formations in an Attempt to Make It More Difficult for a Defense to Disguise Blitzes

Spread formations do not deter the disguise of inside blitzes. A four-wide formation may make it more difficult for a defense to disguise a wideside blitz from the edge, but shortside blitzes from the edge are easily disguised. This is especially true for defenses employing a four-deep secondary.

Zone Drop Pattern Reads

It is important to not only have a defender drop to a spot on the field, but also to give him specific keys so that he can read and react to not only the quarterback, but also to his specific keys. The following pattern-read guidelines (versus a standard pro formation) will assist defenders who are dropping into one of the cover 3 zones.

Strong Hook-Curl Drop

The defender drops to a depth of 12 to 15 yards into the strong hook zone. He keys #2 (the tight end). If #2 runs a vertical route, he stays in the hook and collisions #2. If #2 releases into the flats, the defender sprints to the curl and looks for #1 (the flanker) to run a curl or a post. If #2 runs inside and across his face, the defender tries to collision #2, and then looks for another receiver to run a crossing route into his zone.

Weak Hook-Curl Drop

The defender opens up and drops to a depth of 12 to 15 yards into the weak hook zone. He keys #2 (the weakside halfback). If #2 runs a vertical route, the defender stays in the hook and collisions #2. If #2 releases into the flats, the defender sprints to the curl and looks for #1 (the split end) to run a curl or a post. If #2 runs inside and across his face, the defender tries to collision #2 and then looks for another receiver to run a crossing route into his zone.

Strong Curl-Out Drop

The defender opens up and drops to a depth of 10 to 12 yards. His aiming point is three yards inside of where #1 (the flanker) lined up. He keys #1. If #1 runs an out, the defender tries to get into the throwing lane and get a piece of the ball. If #1 runs a curl or a post, the defender stays inside of #1’s pattern and checks #2 (the tight end). If #2 runs an out, the defender must release from #1’s curl or post when #2 crosses his face. If #1 runs a vertical route, the defender sinks and checks #2 and #3.

Weak Curl-Out Drop

The defender opens up and drops to a depth of 10 to 12 yards. His aiming point is three yards inside of where #1 (the split end) lined up. He keys #1. If #1 runs an out, the defender tries to get into the throwing lane and get a piece of the ball. If #1 runs a curl or a post, the defender stays inside of his pattern and checks #2 (the weakside halfback). If #2 runs an out, the defender must release from #1’s curl or post when #2 crosses his face. If #1 runs a vertical route, the defender sinks and checks #2.

Publisher ‏ : ‎ Coaches Choice (January 15, 2015)
Language ‏ : ‎ English
Perfect Paperback ‏ : ‎ 247 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1606793306
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1606793305
Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 1 pounds